Tag Archive for 'bass'

“You sold the cottage” by Martha and the Muffins

martha.jpgBefore another month goes by, I have to make another post. I have many on deck, and a big project to procrastinate from, so I’m hoping to squeeze in a few posts this week before we go on vacation the first week of August. & on the cusp of something great is the perfect time to post about Martha & the Muffins (later M+M), one of the greatest Canadian bands of all time. & that’s saying a lot.

This track, from their 3rd LP, This is the Ice Age,  is one of my favorites, and demonstrates their keen attention to sound. Their albums are so amazingly mixed it gives me goosebumps to listen to them. Also, this album’s cover is just gorgeous in every detail, down to the tiny typography.

This is the Muffin’s first album produced my Daniel Lanois, the production genuis– he happened to be the brother of Jocylene, the band’s new bassist. Lanois, with Brian Eno, is responsible for blowing the world’s mind with the production on the Joshua Tree. The band eventually had 2 Marthas (!) and even featured Tim “not that Tim Gane” Gane and his brother Mark. Talented siblings.

Martha & The Muffins, “You sold the cottage” from the This is the Ice Age LP on Virgin (1981).

You should pick up a copy of the reissued Danceparc cd ASAP.

Here’s a video of the group performing “Echo Beach,” from their first album.

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 & a mix I recently made featuring their great track “Cheesies & Gum” about 1/3rd of the way in (track 6).

“Nadine” by Kevin Dunn

independents.jpgStrange, fuzz-rock cover of the Chuck Berry Classic from the guy who produced Pylon’s “Cool” and co-produced the B52s’ “Rock Lobster.”

 

The backing vocals on this sound different to me every time I hear them. Some great out-of-control noises on this one as well. Based on this recording, I bought a copy of Kevin Dunn’s C’est toujours la meme guitare LP, but it was shattered when it arrived in the post.  If anyone has this album, I’d LOVE a rip of it.

 

Kevin Dunn, “Nadine” from the A Declaration of Independents compilation LP on Ambition records (1981)

“Spread the Groove” by Bohannon

bohannon.jpgWhat else can be said about you after your name is repeatedly shouted out in one of the greatest songs ever recorded? Not much, so I’ll let Hamilton Bohannon speak mostly for himself. I have to admit, I’d listened to and loved the Tom Tom Club’s “Genius of Love” for more than a decade before I bothered to figure out who this guy was. He created some of the tightest and funkiest dance music of the 70s, I my opinion, and was no slouch when it came to album covers either.

From the sleeve to Dance Your Ass Off:

PLAY THIS RECORD LOUD
P.S. Dance Your Ass Off is not used in the sense of profanity.

There’s a signed 8×10 of Bohannon in the basement of Union Hall, a bar in my neighborhood, that I think is there mostly to spotlight his hairdo. I covet it.

Bohannon, “Spread the Groove” from the Dance Your Ass Off LP on Brunswick Records (1975)

Tom Tom Club’s “Genius of Love”:
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“The Man in the Dark Sedan” by Snakefinger

snake.jpgSnakefinger is lauded for his masterful guitar work, but I think his real genius lays in his ideas about percussion. This album, and this track in particular, give you a taste of that.

A frequent collaborator with the Residents, Snakefinger appears on most of their most recognizable recordings, like “Eskimo” and Tunes of Two Cities. He was set to lay down tracks in 1987 on the Residents’ God in 3 Persons album (which ruined my mind forever when I was 13), but he died of a heart attck while performing on stage just before the sessions.

Snakefinger,”The Man in the Dark Sedan,” from the Greener Postures LP on Ralph Records (1980)

“State Assembly” by The New Age Steppers

newage.jpgGreat freaky dub from one of the best acts on Adrian Sherwood’s On-U Sounds. The New Age Steppers were comprised of former Slits and Pop Group members, members of Aswad, and even Neneh Cherry.

Their earlier albums are a bit on the more experimental side, but they eventually became a pretty serious dub outfit. Frequently collaborating with heavies like Creation Rebel. If you like the sound of that and enjoy this track, I recommend you track down the Massive Hits Vol. 1. CD that was released several years back.

Back in the pre-MP3 player days, I lost my copy of that disc when I set my bag down to tie my shoe one night on Vanderbilt Ave in Brooklyn and forgot to pick it up. I’m sure someone’s enjoying it right now.

The New Age Steppers, “State Assembly” from the New Age Steppers LP on On-U Sounds (1980)

“Strip Me” by Suzi Quatro

suzi.jpgThis sludgey rocker is my favorite Suzi Quatro song. Like much of her work, it’s kind of dirty-clean.

The best part of her career, let’s call it the pre-Leather-with-a-capital-L phase, consists of this rocky, glammy, screamy type stuff; I can’t believe she’s not much more popular. Her later stuff gets a little lite-rock, but my second favorite Quatro jam, “Stumblin’ In,” which she recorded with Smokie (see below), is about as lite as it gets. Picture me and Kelly in a karakoe duet: this is the jam.

Suzi Quatro, “Strip Me” from the Your Mama Wouldn’t Like Me LP on Arista (1976)

SO BAD ASS.

Her breakthrough 1973 song, “Can the can”:
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& 1979′s “Stumblin’ In”:
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“Franklin’s Theme,” by Bill Loose

cherryFirst off, this song is way too short. It’s the standout track on the soundtrack to Russ Meyer’s Cherry & Harry, & Raquel, which I haven’t seen. Franklin must be some slick, meandering cat though, if this is his theme.

I put this on a few mixtapes in the late 90s, and everyone who heard it wanted to borrow it to sample. I felt like it deserved to live on its own (and I am usually all about remixing things) because it was so unique. I’ve played this track at all points on my turntable’s pitch sliders, and it always comes out sounding sludgey & fresh.

Bill’s got some pretty impressive composing and music direction credits (including being the uncredited stock music composer for Romero’s original Night of the Living Dead). I bought this record at Papa Jazz in Columbia, SC, about 10 years ago. You see a lot of Russ Meyer soundtracks repackaged and reissued, but I’ve yet to see this one among them. All of the music is worth a listen, though.

Bill Loose,”Franklin’s Theme,” From the Original Soundtrack recording of Cherry & Harry, & Raquel (1970)

Incidentally, I was first pointed to Russ Meyer’s movies by Redd Kross’s first album, Born Innocent, on which they cover “Look On Up From The Bottom,” as played below by Beyond The Valley of the Dolls’ The Carrie Nations. I’m still not sure which version is better.
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Actually, while your at it, check out “In the Long Run” as well:
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& “Find it,” which is a terrific rip off of Shocking Blue’s “Hot Sand”:
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What a great movie.