Monthly Archive for December, 2007

“Coprolalia” by Hole

hole.jpgNo, not that Hole. Not much online about this group or label, but they did put out this and another 12″, Dyskinesia, which I’ve yet to find in a store. This is one of the few records I managed to actually buy at Cheapo in Austin.

A nice, dark sample play track to increase your holiday cheer. Some nice dubby overtones here.

Hole, “Coprolalia” from the Other Voices Other Tongues LP on EYAS Media (1988)

“Decollage” and “Fonce a Mort” by the Honeymoon Killers

honey.jpgA couple of great tracks from Belgium’s The Honeymoon Killers. I couldn’t settle for a single one, so here are my two faves from this disc. Actually, now that I’m looking around, I realize you can purchase pristine versions of the entire album from other’s digital download site. Go for it. Also, there’s a 2007 remix of “Decollage” Prins Thomas’s 2007 release Cosmo Galactic Prism 2CD, which you can and should by at other music.

An uncited Wikipedia quote sez:

Live on stage The Honeymoon Killers often used pre-recorded drum machine loops which were played from cassette, over this they put guitar, bass, drums, trashy percussion, cheap-sounding organ, with Vromman and Vincent taking turns on singing. Some of their songs were extended to 20 minutes with their own brand of dub echo effects.

Sounds like fun, huh? I once posted that I purchased this album, and someone emailed me offering like $50 for it. Here’s a little for free. The CD/digital re-release of it are well worth tracking down.

The Honeymoon Killers, “Decollage” from the Les Tueres de la Lune de Miel” LP (1981)

The Honeymoon Killers, “Fonce a Mort” from the Les Tueres de la Lune de Miel” LP (1981)

Mutant Sounds has a super-rare album available (for free of course!) of the group that eventually released this disc in 1981, named, like this album, Les Tueures de la Lune de Miel. Go grab it and thank them!

Also, the always-terrific MissingToof.com featured them earlier this year on a New Wave Tuesday post; a couple tracks available there, including their full-blast version of Serge Gainsbourg’s “Laisse Tomber Les Filles”. 

Here’s a somewhat-tame live taste, from Dutch TV in 1983:[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/HZrDJvXyKBY" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

Update: The Walrus Music Blog has what sounds like a higher-quality version of “Decollage” as well as the song performed above.

“Inkpot” by Shocking Blue

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Continuing in the same genre: another tough, layered female-led pop song.

Most know Shocking Blue from Bananarama’s cover of their hit “Venus.” This is probably my 2nd or 3rd favorite song by SB (“Hot Sand” and “Send Me a Postcard” figure in there too), but the lyrics for this one are the best. Is “putting the ink in the ink pot” really something everyone can relate to? It kinda makes me think I don’t properly know how to put some love in my heart. Notice the early sitar lead-in that they didn’t edit out. All of these pieces make a great whole.

Shocking Blue, “Inkpot” (1972)

Check out this great video for their version of “Venus”:[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/U2DBcbZc3ck" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]
They have such a great look.

I’ll post more tunes from this era in Dutch music soon.

“Crystal Clear” by the Darling Buds

darling.jpgI miss hearing stuff like this on the radio. The Darling Buds get lumped in with all of the late-80s/early-90s woman-led British bands, but they stick out for me for some reason. I’m kind of a sucker for poppy stuff like this where someone paid way too much attention to the background guitar sounds.

Though not on this record, former Darling Bud Donna Matthews played in Elastica as well.

The Darling Buds, “Crystal Clear” from the Crawdaddy LP on Epic Records (1990)

On Youtube:
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/0qHZROQWGRo" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

“Crash,” by the Primitives, the group I always confuse with the Darling Buds:
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/AQFo2-xZiks" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

“Cleopatra” by Elastica

elastica.jpgHorrible surface-noisy recording of the free flexi that came with vinyl copies of Electrica’s 1995 LP. Nothing unexpected here, but seemed like I needed to ri this before it completely disintegrated.

I always loved this group’s unassuming, lazy-almost-bored delivery. Also, you gotta love a band who’s not afraid to bite both Wire and the Stranglers.

Next up is an Elastica related post, by member Donna Matthews’ prior band, the Darling Buds. Seems like I’m posting a lot of female lead vocal stuff lately, huh? Don’t expect it to stop.

Elastica, “Cleopatra” from the free flexi 45 accompanying the Elastica LP on Geffen Records (1995)

“Can You Feel It” by the Jacksons with Jane Fonda

jane.jpgWhy? No real reason, I guess.

I love this Jacksons song, and the reason I picked up this disc for a quarter or whatever was to have an additional copy to juggle with the actual song. I hope Jane’s counting off is as jarring to you as it was for me.

Get fit folks!

The Jacksons with Jane Fonda,”Can You Feel It” from the Jane Fonda’s Workout Record LP on Columbia (1981)

“Show Business” by Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson

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I love any song that reminds me of the circus. This is from one of Gil Scott-Heron‘s strong, funky post “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised“-fame late 70s LPs with Brian Jackson.

This music is so polished and tight; the keys and beat in it sound like they came right out of a computer to me. Madison Avenue is my other jam from this album. I prefer his groovier, more singy music, which I feel often out-politics his spoken word work because the verses are so well-crafted and succinct. I’ll probably end up sharing a lot more in this vein.

Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson, “Show Business” from the Secrets LP on Arista Records (1978)

The Bottle:
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/_b2F-XX0Ol0" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

Hold On:[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/uTCQSk2l8bc" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

“Bint (Cornelis De Bondt 1979-1980)” by Hoketus

bint.jpgI bought this record on a trip to Amsterdam with my friend Jay, whom I was visiting while he lived in Germany in the late 90s. We were there for about a week, and managed a couple of great days for record shopping. I picked this up at a store called Record Palace which still seems to be going strong. I also picked up the soundtrack to one of my favorite movies, Over the Edge, which is one of only 2 LP covers I’ve ever put in a picture frame. This one is probably suitable for framing too.

Anyway, this mp3 is one whole side of the LP, about 30 minutes of the ensemble Hoketus playing Cornelis De Bondt‘s 1980 composition Bint. Click on it and find something to get lost in for about a half hour. It’s a rich bit of minimalist composition with a resolution that is worth the wait. From the sleeve:

Bint is a process: the proccess of making audible a structure based on a framework of two different pulsations. — Cornelis de Bondt

Indeed. Flip side is Diderik Wagenaar’s Tam Tam.

Hoektus, “Bint (Cornelius De Bondt 1979-1980)” from the Composers’ Voice 8101 LP (1981)

“Compulsion X-TRA Beats” by Time Traveler

timet.jpgIs this actually the official sound of 1988? I think it might be. This is a great little instrumental moment from a kinda throw-away 12″ I have from Roll Records.

I know almost nothing about the artist, Time Traveler (or do we attribute this to ISH, the producer?), except that his/her name is incredibly accurate. All of the sudden, there I am, in the late 80s, swimming in synthetic cowbells and handclaps. Short and sweet.

The stamp on the sleeve says “Property of Gerald the Whirl.”

Time Traveler, “Compulsion X-TRA Beats” from the Compulsion 12″ on Roll Records (1988)

“Strip Me” by Suzi Quatro

suzi.jpgThis sludgey rocker is my favorite Suzi Quatro song. Like much of her work, it’s kind of dirty-clean.

The best part of her career, let’s call it the pre-Leather-with-a-capital-L phase, consists of this rocky, glammy, screamy type stuff; I can’t believe she’s not much more popular. Her later stuff gets a little lite-rock, but my second favorite Quatro jam, “Stumblin’ In,” which she recorded with Smokie (see below), is about as lite as it gets. Picture me and Kelly in a karakoe duet: this is the jam.

Suzi Quatro, “Strip Me” from the Your Mama Wouldn’t Like Me LP on Arista (1976)

SO BAD ASS.

Her breakthrough 1973 song, “Can the can”:
[kml_flashembed movie="http://youtube.com/v/7SXWgC0SLCA" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

& 1979′s “Stumblin’ In”:
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/_am1ydf8QRA" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]